Word Lookup

Anagrammer dictionary lookup gives you the ability to perform quick word validity check, word definitions, scores and more. The info provided is valid for Scrabble, Words With Friends and many other word games.

SCRABBLE DICTIONARY

The latest version of the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary was released in August 2014. It is the fifth edition of this dictionary. In order to be the player who still has an edge over your competitors, it would be wise to review the latest edition since it now has included an additional 5,000 new words that will be officially playable in North America. This, of course, would not come as a shock to Scrabble players around the world who have been playing the game since their childhood. There have been numerous changes and updates to the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary over the last few decades. So, if you have not been reviewing the new words and refreshing your memory, now is the time to start updating your Scrabble brain to the 21st century with Anagrammer's Scrabble dictionary guide. Anagrammer has all the latest updates and new word inclusions to help you refresh your memory with all of the existing words and expand your mind to begin memorizing all of the new words.

POINT OF REFERENCE
Over the years there have been many changes to the original Scrabble dictionary since it was first published in 1978 by Merriam-Webster in collaboration with the National Scrabble Association (NSA). It was developed as a result of the start of national scrabble clubs and tournaments who needed a standard point of reference for regulatory play. Basically, a go-to Scrabble dictionary was deemed necessary to validate permissible words and to have no word challenges remain unanswered.

One would think it would be rather straightforward to agree on a regular dictionary of words to be used as an authoritative book during gameplay, however, many changes have occurred to the official dictionary. Controversy has been present on the continual spectrum of permissible Scrabble words. The use of particular words and their alleged questionable definitions has enveloped Scrabble enthusiasts in an ongoing debate that has resolved in satisfied and not-so-satisfied players and company representatives alike. Controversy and Scrabble? How is that possible one might ask, but it is true. Words speak louder than actions, which in this case, certain words have caused quite a stir in the world of Scrabble.

WORD DEBATE
According to Wikipedia, before Merriam-Websters first version of the Scrabble dictionary was published, "Scrabble clubs and tournaments used Funk & Wagnalls Standard College Dictionary as an official word source, but as tournament play grew, this source proved unsatisfactory. The inclusion of foreign words such as "Ja" and "Oui", the exclusion of common words such as "coven" and "surreal", and a lack of clear guidance on the creation of comparative terms, were all problematic for Scrabble players." This was only the beginning of more issues to come in the future, but who could have predicted that since those who had no interest in Scrabble would simply shrug it off and say that it is only a word game. I guess no one truly understands how passionate people are when it comes to Scrabble. Is it a hobby or even a lifestyle? The answer to this question probably depends on who you are talking to. Is it just a game? Well, I personally don't believe so.

Have you ever played Scrabble with someone who adamantly disagreed with you concerning a permissible word? Well, if you have, you know that a friendly discussion over the root meaning of a word and how it can be used in a sentence can quickly turn awry when all of a sudden you are involved in a heated debate and need to start censoring words you are using in your explanation. I have British friends who enjoy playing Scrabble, however, because of the differences in language and Scrabble dictionaries, games last a lot longer. Word discussions become lengthy and detailed up to a point that I wish I hadn't dropped my Latin language class in college. Patience becomes a virtue very quickly.

SCRABBLE-SPHERE SCANDAL
The Scrabble game manufacturers at the time (ownership has exchanged hands more than a few times) had all the words from five collegiate dictionaries compiled into the first Official Scrabble Players Dictionary, or OSPD for short. OSPD is used by speakers of American and Canadian English. During this time, the compilation process was done by hand resulting in numerous omissions and errors. This dictionary debacle spurred more spirited word debates among casual and competitive players. For example, "the word granola was present in all five nominated dictionaries but not in the OSPD. A second edition, OSPD 2, was released in 1991. The fourth edition, OSPD 4, was published in 2005 with 4000 new words. Two of the new words that were added included "QI" (the vital force that in Chinese thought is inherent in all things) and "ZA" (short for pizza), which became popular rather quickly since creating hooks during a Scrabble game with the letters "Q" and "Z" became a sigh of relief for many players. I have no qualms with the definition of the word "QI". However, I think "ZA" might be a bit of a stretch. The next time I request "za" delivery, I will remember to ask for "roni" and "chovies" as my topping choices. But, I love the game too much to take issue with an abridged version of an Italian pie. Either way, it will help me create a hook during the game at one point or another, so memorizing the two-letter word list remains of vital importance in the world of Scrabble.

The five dictionaries that were used in the compilation of the first OSPD were: Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (1973), Funk & Wagnalls (1973), The Random House College Dictionary (1968), Webster's New World Dictionary (1970), and The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (1969). Many words were considered offensive to many individuals and community groups. Also, all five of the collegiate dictionaries used were printed in the 1960s and 1970s, so certain words and their meanings had certain cultural definitions based on that particular era. As the world develops and continues to grow, our culture produces subcultures, thus the creation of new words and new meanings, spawning other new words and new meanings. This word cycle will most likely continue over time especially since even new meanings to existing words seem more of the norm more often than not.

CASUAL PLAY VS. COMPETITIVE PLAY
In 1994, Hasbro's announcement of removing nearly 200 words from the OPSD that were considered offensive by various community groups created quite a scandal. The National Scrabble Association did not want words to be removed since it would mainly affect word usage and validity during gameplay. These words, including playground phrases and ethnic slurs, lead Hasbro to publish two official versions of the Scrabble dictionary, one for casual players to be used at home or school, and one for use at clubs and tournaments. As a compromise, the version for the clubs and tournaments contain 120,302 words, includes the "offensive" and "dirty" words without definitions.

The latest edition of the OSPD, which is the fifth version, was published in August 2014 with 5000 new words. There are also four new two-letter words: "DA" (short for "dad", "GI" (a martial arts garment), "PO" (a chamber pot), and "TE" (a variant of the musical note "ti"). A contest was held in March 2014 in which players had the opportunity to nominate and choose a new word to be included in the latest version of the dictionary. As a result of the online fan vote, "GEOCACHE" is now an acceptable Scrabble word since its inclusion in the fifth edition of the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary.
POINT OF REFERENCE
Over the years there have been many changes to the original Scrabble dictionary since it was first published in 1978 by Merriam-Webster in collaboration with the National Scrabble Association (NSA). It was developed as a result of the start of national scrabble clubs and tournaments who needed a standard point of reference for regulatory play. Basically, a go-to Scrabble dictionary was deemed necessary to validate permissible words and to have no word challenges remain unanswered.

One would think it would be rather straightforward to agree on a regular dictionary of words to be used as an authoritative book during gameplay, however, many changes have occurred to the official dictionary. Controversy has been present on the continual spectrum of permissible Scrabble words. The use of particular words and their alleged questionable definitions has enveloped Scrabble enthusiasts in an ongoing debate that has resolved in satisfied and not-so-satisfied players and company representatives alike. Controversy and Scrabble? How is that possible one might ask, but it is true. Words speak louder than actions, which in this case, certain words have caused quite a stir in the world of Scrabble.

WORD DEBATE
According to Wikipedia, before Merriam-Websters first version of the Scrabble dictionary was published, "Scrabble clubs and tournaments used Funk & Wagnalls Standard College Dictionary as an official word source, but as tournament play grew, this source proved unsatisfactory. The inclusion of foreign words such as "Ja" and "Oui", the exclusion of common words such as "coven" and "surreal", and a lack of clear guidance on the creation of comparative terms, were all problematic for Scrabble players." This was only the beginning of more issues to come in the future, but who could have predicted that since those who had no interest in Scrabble would simply shrug it off and say that it is only a word game. I guess no one truly understands how passionate people are when it comes to Scrabble. Is it a hobby or even a lifestyle? The answer to this question probably depends on who you are talking to. Is it just a game? Well, I personally don't believe so.

Have you ever played Scrabble with someone who adamantly disagreed with you concerning a permissible word? Well, if you have, you know that a friendly discussion over the root meaning of a word and how it can be used in a sentence can quickly turn awry when all of a sudden you are involved in a heated debate and need to start censoring words you are using in your explanation. I have British friends who enjoy playing Scrabble, however, because of the differences in language and Scrabble dictionaries, games last a lot longer. Word discussions become lengthy and detailed up to a point that I wish I hadn't dropped my Latin language class in college. Patience becomes a virtue very quickly.

SCRABBLE-SPHERE SCANDAL
The Scrabble game manufacturers at the time (ownership has exchanged hands more than a few times) had all the words from five collegiate dictionaries compiled into the first Official Scrabble Players Dictionary, or OSPD for short. OSPD is used by speakers of American and Canadian English. During this time, the compilation process was done by hand resulting in numerous omissions and errors. This dictionary debacle spurred more spirited word debates among casual and competitive players. For example, "the word granola was present in all five nominated dictionaries but not in the OSPD. A second edition, OSPD 2, was released in 1991. The fourth edition, OSPD 4, was published in 2005 with 4000 new words. Two of the new words that were added included "QI" (the vital force that in Chinese thought is inherent in all things) and "ZA" (short for pizza), which became popular rather quickly since creating hooks during a Scrabble game with the letters "Q" and "Z" became a sigh of relief for many players. I have no qualms with the definition of the word "QI". However, I think "ZA" might be a bit of a stretch. The next time I request "za" delivery, I will remember to ask for "roni" and "chovies" as my topping choices. But, I love the game too much to take issue with an abridged version of an Italian pie. Either way, it will help me create a hook during the game at one point or another, so memorizing the two-letter word list remains of vital importance in the world of Scrabble.

The five dictionaries that were used in the compilation of the first OSPD were: Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (1973), Funk & Wagnalls (1973), The Random House College Dictionary (1968), Webster's New World Dictionary (1970), and The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (1969). Many words were considered offensive to many individuals and community groups. Also, all five of the collegiate dictionaries used were printed in the 1960s and 1970s, so certain words and their meanings had certain cultural definitions based on that particular era. As the world develops and continues to grow, our culture produces subcultures, thus the creation of new words and new meanings, spawning other new words and new meanings. This word cycle will most likely continue over time especially since even new meanings to existing words seem more of the norm more often than not.

CASUAL PLAY VS. COMPETITIVE PLAY
In 1994, Hasbro's announcement of removing nearly 200 words from the OPSD that were considered offensive by various community groups created quite a scandal. The National Scrabble Association did not want words to be removed since it would mainly affect word usage and validity during gameplay. These words, including playground phrases and ethnic slurs, lead Hasbro to publish two official versions of the Scrabble dictionary, one for casual players to be used at home or school, and one for use at clubs and tournaments. As a compromise, the version for the clubs and tournaments contain 120,302 words, includes the "offensive" and "dirty" words without definitions.

The latest edition of the OSPD, which is the fifth version, was published in August 2014 with 5000 new words. There are also four new two-letter words: "DA" (short for "dad", "GI" (a martial arts garment), "PO" (a chamber pot), and "TE" (a variant of the musical note "ti"). A contest was held in March 2014 in which players had the opportunity to nominate and choose a new word to be included in the latest version of the dictionary. As a result of the online fan vote, "GEOCACHE" is now an acceptable Scrabble word since its inclusion in the fifth edition of the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary.